Research Partnerships


In addition to conducting countless clinical studies in-house, USANA scientists often collaborate with respected universities and research centers to ensure our formulations remain on the cutting-edge of nutritional science and to test the effectiveness of our products in helping consumers achieve optimal health.

Universities
USANA has partnered with a number of universities to conduct research studies, including the University of Utah, Boston University, and the University of Sydney. In early 2008, USANA announced the results of a large, third-party clinical study completed at the University of Colorado Denver, which confirmed that lifestyle changes involving diet, supplementation, and exercise, can improve metabolic syndrome (Wyatt HR, et al).

Specific university research sponsored by USANA includes:

Linus Pauling Institute
In 2007, USANA announced a 10-year partnership with the Linus Pauling Institute (LPI). Based at Oregon State University, LPI is one of the nation’s first two Centers of Excellence for Research on Complementary and Alternative Medicine designated by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine of the National Institutes of Health. The Linus Pauling Institute conducts research based on the idea that a balanced and nutritious diet is the key to optimal health. USANA works closely with LPI to explore new products and ingredients and conduct extensive studies on the health benefits associated with key nutrients.

LPI papers, abstracts, and presentations supported by USANA include:

  • Barker T, Leonard SW, Hansen J, Trawick RH, Ingram R, Burdett G, Lebold K, Walker JA, Traber MG. Vitamin E and C supplementation does not ameliorate muscle dysfunction following anterior cruciate ligament surgery. 2009. Free Radic Biol Med 47:1611-8.
  • Barker T, Leonard SW, Martins TB, Trawick RH, Hill HR, Kjeldsberg CR, Traber MG. Cytokine alteration following antioxidant supplementation and anterior cruciate ligament surgery. 2009. American College of Sports Medicine, Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise 41:5 (Supplement).
  • Barker T, Leonard S, Trawick RH, Martins TB, Hill HR, Traber MG. The influence of alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid on circulating inflammatory cytokines following anterior cruciate ligament surgery. 2008. Free Radical Summer School, Spetses, Greece.
  • Barker T, Leonard SW, Trawick RH, Martins TB, Kjeldsberg CR, Hill HR, Traber MG. Modulation of inflammation by vitamin E and C supplementation prior to anterior cruciate ligament surgery. 2009. Free Radic Biol Med 46:599-606.
  • Barker T, Leonard SW, Trawick RH, Martins TB, Kjeldsberg CR, Hill HR, Walker JA, Traber MG. The supplementation of vitamins E and C modulate the relationship between circulating mediators of muscle weakness but not limb strength following anterior cruciate ligament surgery. 2009. Diet and Optimum Health Conference, Portland, OR.
  • Barker T, Martins TB, Hill HR, Kjeldsberg CR, Trawick RH, Leonard SW, Walker JA, Traber MG. Antioxidants induced cytokine alterations indicative of a better prognosis after ACL surgery. 2010. FASEB J 24:535.7.
  • Barker T, Martins TB, Hill HR, Kjeldsberg CR, Trawick RH, Leonard SW, Walker JA, Traber MG. Vitamin E and C supplementation modulates cytokine associations after ACL surgery indicative of a better prognosis. 20XX. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, in review.
  • Barker T, Martins TB, Hill HR, Kjeldsberg CR, Trawick RH, Leonard SW, Walker JA, Traber MG. (2011) Vitamins E and C modulate the association between reciprocally regulated cytokines after an anterior cruciate ligament injury and surgery. Am J Phys Med Rehabil 90:638-647.
  • Barker T, Traber MG. Does Vitamin E and C Supplementation Improve the Recovery from Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery?. 20XX. Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine, in review.
  • Bemer B, Krueger SK, Orner GA. Sulindac pharmacokinetics. The role of flavin-containing monooxygenases. 2008. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Summer Internship Presentation, Oregon State University, September 26.
  • Frei, B., Birlouez-Aragon, I., and Lykkesfeldt, J. (2012) Authors’ perspective: What is the optimum intake of vitamin C in humans? Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 52(9):815-29.
  • Johnson S, Hagen TM. Changes in Acute Human Plasma Glutathione Levels Following Lipoic Acid Supplementation. 2009. Howard Hughes Medical Institute Summer Internship presentation, Oregon State University, September 24, 2009, and Center for Health Aging Research Life Scholars presentation, Oregon State University, October 14, 2009.
  • Jubert C, Mata J, Bench G, Dashwood R, Pereira C, Tracewell W, Turteltaub K, Williams D, Baily G. Effects of chlorophyll and chlorophyllin on low-dose aflatoxin B1 pharmacokinetics in human volunteers. 2009. Cancer Prevention Research 2(12):1015-22.
  • Kesinger NG, Langsdorf BL, Yokochi AF, Miranda CL, and Stevens JF. Formation of a vitamin C conjugate of acrolein and its paraoxonase-mediated conversion into 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroxy-4-oxooctanal. 2010. Chem Res Toxicol 23:836-44.
  • Legette LC, Ma L, Reed RL, Miranda CL, Christensen JM, Rodriguez-Proteau R, Stevens JF. (2012) Pharmacokinetics of xanthohumol and metabolites in rats after oral and intravenous administration. Mol Nurt Food Res. 56(3):466-74.
  • Leonard SW, Barker T, Mustacich DJ, Traber MG. Measurement of vitamin K homologues in biological fluids and tissues by APCI LC/MS. 2009. Diet and Optimum Health Conference, Portland, OR.
  • Leonard SW, Barker T, Mustacich DJ, Traber MG. Measurement of vitamin K homologues in biological fluids and tissues by APCI LC/MS. 2010. Experimental Biology, Anaheim, CA.
  • Leonard SW, Barker T, Taylor AW, Traber MG. APCI LC-MS quantitation of vitamin K in the plasma of anterior cruciate ligament surgery patients. 20XX. Analytical Biochemistry, in review.
  • Lotito SB, Zhang WJ, Yang CS, Crozier A, and Frei B. (2011) Metabolic conversion of dietary flavonoids alters their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Free Radic Biol Med 51:454-463.
  • Michels AJ, Dickinson BC, Chang CJ, Frei B. Generation of HO by ascorbate auto-oxidation: possible implications for cancer therapy. 2010. Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL.
  • Peluso MR, Miranda CL, Hobbs DJ, Proteau RR, Stevens JF. Xanthohumol and related prenylated flavonoids inhibit inflammatory cytokine production in LPS-activated THP-1 monocytes: structure-activity relationships and in silico binding to myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2). 2010. Planta Med 76:1536-43.
  • Song Y, Chung CS, Bruno RS, Traber MG, Brown KH, King JC, Ho E. Dietary zinc restriction and repletion affects DNA integrity in healthy men. 2009. Am J Clin Nutr 90:321-8.
  • Song Y, Chung CS, Bruno RS, Traber MG, Brown KH, King JC, Ho E. Zinc status affects DNA damage and oxidative stress in healthy adult men. 2009. FASEB J 23:216.1. (Yang Song won the Young Investigator award with the American Society of Nutrition for this work.)
  • Song Y, Ho E. Effects of zinc deficiency on DNA damage, oxidative stress and oxidant defense in peripheral blood. 2008. FASEB J 22:A697.
  • Traber MG, Barker T. Vitamins E and C in ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) Injury. 2009. 3rd International Symposium; Nutrition, Oxygen Biology and Medicine. Paris, France.
  • Yilmazer-Musa M, Griffith AM, Michels AJ, Schneider E, Frei B. (2012) Grape seed extracts and catechin 3-gallates are potent inhibitors of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity. J Agric Food Chem. 2012 Jun 29.
  • Yilmazer-Musa M, Tucker AM, Frei B. Inhibition of a-amylase and a-glucosidase activity by bioflavonoids: implications for carbohydrate metabolism and type-2 diabetes mellitus. 2010. Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL.

The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital (TOSH)
USANA and The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital (TOSH) began formal research collaboration in 2009, though an informal research partnership existed since 2007. TOSH is a leading facility for orthopedic surgical care, rehabilitation, physical therapy, sports performance training, and nutrition counseling. In addition, TOSH has an extensive research program that includes orthopedic surgery, sports medicine, exercise physiology, sports biomechanics, physical therapy, occupational therapy, athletic sports performance training, and nutrition. Working in close collaboration with scientists, doctors, therapists and students, TOSH works to develop a better understanding of factors that affect human performance, the risk of injury to sports participants of all ages and levels, and optimal medical interventions to help get individuals back to their healthiest as quickly as possible.

TOSH papers, abstracts, and presentations supported by USANA include:

  • Barker T. Chapter 5: Vitamin D and Inflammation and Chapter 6: Vitamin E and Inflammation. In: Garg ML, Wood LG. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Inflammatory Diseases. CABI; 2012.
  • Barker T, Martins TB, Hill HR, Kjeldsberg CR, Trawick RH, Leonard SW, Walker JA, Traber MG. Vitamins E and C Modulate the Association Between Reciprocally Regulated Cytokines After an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury and Surgery.  2011. American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Mar 22. [Epub ahead of print].
  • Barker T, Dixon BM, Schneider ED, Weaver LK. Smaller concentration-supplementation slopes at a higher vitamin D treatment dose. (20XX). Experimental Biology, in review.
  • Barker T, Henriksen VT, Martins TB, et al. Higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d concentrations associate with a faster recovery of skeletal muscle strength after muscular injury. Nutrients. 2013;5(4):1253-75.
  • Barker T, Martins TB, Hill HR, Dixon BM, Schneider ED, Weaver LK. Different doses of supplemental vitamin D mediate disparate cytokine responses. (20XX). To be submitted.
  • (Certain papers were published in collaboration with both TOSH and LPI scientists.  For sake of brevity, these papers are listed only in the LPI section.)
  • Barker T, Traber MG. Does Vitamin E and C Supplementation Improve the Recovery From Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery? 2011. Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine 16(2): 114-128. http://chp.sagepub.com/content/16/2/114.abstract

Glycemic Index Foundation
A collaboration between the University of Sydney, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation of Australia, and Diabetes Australia—the Glycemic Index Foundation (GIF) backs the GI Symbol Program in Australia. The GI Symbol Program is the only independent worldwide GI certification program requiring foods meet a number of criteria to prove they are a healthy choice within their food group. All USANA Foods carry the GI Symbol in Australia, and all testing data quality has been verified by the GIF.

USANA Health Sciences is known for manufacturing the highest quality products backed by a potency guarantee. To ensure you and your family are receiving genuine world-class USANA products, purchase them only through your independent USANA Associate or www.usana.com.
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